Absorb activities

Absorb activities inform and inspire. Absorb activities enable motivated learners to obtain crucial, up‐to‐date information they need to do their jobs or to further their learning. In absorb activities learners read, listen, and watch. These activities may sound passive, but they can be an active component of learning.

Here are some examples of absorb activities:

Slide show presentation

Slide shows rely primarily on text and graphics to tell their stories. They may also incorporate sound, animation, and video. Some include interactive media like virtual reality models or small simulations. Although slide shows may allow some optional topics, the primary pathway is linear. This structure lets the designer control the order of learning experiences. … Continue reading Slide show presentation

Software demonstration

Creating a System DSN is an example of a multi-level software simulation. It contains a narrated and animated demonstration, a simulation, a self-test, and a real-world activity to teach learners how to confidently define a system data source name. This version requires Flash. If you have difficulties with the pop-up window, try starting the example … Continue reading Software demonstration

Scenario demonstration

Several types or genres of software demonstrations are possible. One popular type shows a scenario involving use of a program to accomplish a particular piece of work. About the example This example starts with the goal of adding a hyperlink to an object on a Keynote slide so that the learner can click the hotspot to display … Continue reading Scenario demonstration

User-interface tour

Another very common type of software demonstration is the user-interface tour. It shows an important part of a computer program, such as a complex command or a valuable capability. About the example This example demonstrates the capability within the countdown timer to add names of people to a list, and have a random name displayed … Continue reading User-interface tour

Feature demonstration

Another very common type of software demonstration is the feature demonstration. It shows an important part of a computer program, such as a complex command or a valuable capability. About the example This example demonstrates the capability within the countdown timer to add names of people to a list and have a random name displayed … Continue reading Feature demonstration

Extended examples

Supply examples, examples, examples. Many lectures have too much theory and not enough concrete, specific, realistic examples. Remember, not everyone can reason from general concepts to particular applications, or at least not without the help of examples that they can understand and apply. About the Example The topic shown here is from a course on … Continue reading Extended examples

Augmented presentation

An especially effective presentation can serve as the core of a topic or lesson. To turn a presentation into a more comprehensive learning experience, consider augmenting it with navigation controls to allow learners to move back and forth in the presentation. You may also need to add an introduction with instructions for playing the presentation, … Continue reading Augmented presentation

Stories

Good instructors often tell stories and effective learners frequently remember the stories better than any other part of the course. Such stories are an indispensable part of much soft-skills training. If the words and tone of voice of the instructor are essential ingredients in classroom learning—well then, you had better find a way to include … Continue reading Stories

Active examples

One of the most valuable forms of online resources is a library of examples that learners can actually manipulate and use. About the example The example shown here offers HTML ingredients that can be used in Web pages to create tables, headings, bullet lists, and so forth. A learner can choose a particular ingredient from … Continue reading Active examples

Guided tours

The guided tour orients the learner in a virtual or real environment. It can be used to lead learners through an online representation of a real environment, such as teaching the layout of equipment in the bay of an ambulance, the twists and turns of a river channel, or the sequence of rock strata in … Continue reading Guided tours

Of the three types of activities (absorb, do, and connect), absorb activities are the ones closest to pure information. Absorb activities usually consist of information and the actions learners take to extract and comprehend knowledge from that information. In absorb activities, the learner may be physically passive yet mentally active—actively perceiving, processing, consolidating, considering, and judging the information. In absorb activities, it is the content (really the designer or teacher or writer of it) that is in control. The learner absorbs some of the knowledge offered by the content.

(Excerpted from E-learning by Design.)

E-learning design specialists